W H O   W E   A R E

Threadbare Theatre Workshop illuminates epics in a simple way through the magic of resourceful storytelling, laying bare our humanity so we may thread more empathy into existence.

We are committed to making theatre from scratch across the local landscape, engaging alternative spaces to foster creative partnerships within the community. We have expanded this mission to celebrate and elevate the heritage of rural places, teaming up with denizens to devise an original work through collective creation.


   2 0 1 8 S E A S O N

In May & June, Threadbare was in residence at Opera House Arts & Haystack Mountain School of Crafts to develop an original play rooted in the history of Deer Isle, Maine and beyond.

The Royal Tar, an original, participatory performance, engaged Deer Isle & neighboring peninsula communities in all aspects of crafting this true story that has become legend up & down the Maritimes. A local cast & chorus of twenty, ages 5-92, performed for packed houses at Burnt Cove Church Community Center over Labor Day weekend. The set, sound, and lighting design, props, and costumes all featured work by local makers & collaborators.

Kate Russell, director, and Joshua McCarey, choreographer, before they opened doors to community members eager to participate in rehearsals to devise  The Royal Tar.   |  May 2018

Kate Russell, director, and Joshua McCarey, choreographer, before they opened doors to community members eager to participate in rehearsals to devise The Royal Tar. | May 2018


O U R I N A U G U R A L   S E A S O N | 2 0 1 5 & 2 0 1 6

Before continuing our work in the country’s most rural state, we began by celebrating bold re-imaginings in the backyards of New York City with original, environmental adaptations of Moby-Dick and The Waste Land. or, The Whale was performed aboard the Lehigh Valley Barge #79 in the Red Hook harbor and WasteLand, under a full Hunter's moon at Smiling Hogshead Ranch— an abandoned railroad turned urban farm in the heart of Long Island City. 

Combining the gravity of Moby-Dick with the accessibility of a live small-ensemble play, and, well, the fact that it all takes place aboard the National Registry listed Lehigh Valley Barge #79, OR, THE WHALE takes a wholly different approach to Melville’s epic... the eight person play’s soliloquies are reminiscent of Shakespeare and blend his influence into the story and the writing. The acting is commanding and open, the writing sharp and clear. All this supported by subtle and masterful sound and lighting design, creates an immersive and powerful theatre experience.
— the creator's project, VICE